Category Archives: Christendom News

BOKO HARAM SECT VOWS TO KEEP LEAH SHARIBU ‘SLAVE FOR LIFE’

By Lindy Lowry in Stories of Persecution (Open Doors USA)

We are reporting difficult news today about kidnapped Nigerian Christian schoolgirl Leah Sharibu—one month after a faction of Boko Haram, the Islamic State West Africa Province (ISWAP), surfaced a video of an execution of a kidnapped aid worker and issued a one-month deadline to the Nigerian government, threatening to kill Leah and two other kidnapped aid workers abducted during a March 2018 raid on a military facility in Rann.

One month to the day of their recent deadline, ISWAP militants have released a video of the second execution of one of the two remaining kidnapped aid workers, 24-year-old midwife Hauwa Leman. They also threatened to keep Leah Sharibu and the third aid worker, Alice Ngaddah, as “slaves for life.”

Also read 👉🏼PERSECUTION OF CHRISTIANS

In a short clip seen by a special correspondent of Nigerian newspaper The Cable, a spokesperson for the Islamic extremist group said:

“We have kept our word exactly as we said, by killing Hauwa Leman, who is working with the International Committee of the Red Cross.

“Saifura and Hauwa were killed because they are considered as Murtads (apostates) by the group because they were once Muslims that have abandoned their Islam, the moment they chose to work with the Red Cross, and for us, there is no difference between Red Cross and UNICEF.

“If we see them, we will kill the apostates among them, men or women, and choose to kill or keep the infidels as slaves, men or women.”

‘LEAH AND ALICE WILL BE OUR SLAVES’

In the same statement issued today, militants threatened to keep Leah Sharibu and the third aid worker, Alice Ngaddah, as “our slaves, ”The Cable reported.

“From today, Sharibu and Ngaddah are now our slaves. Based on our doctrines, it is now lawful for us to do whatever we want to do with them.”

Both Leah and Alice are Christians. Alice is a mother of two who works with UNICEF. Leah was one of 110 girls kidnapped from the Government Girls’ Science and Technical College in Dapchi on February 19, 2018. While her Muslim classmates were released through back-channel efforts, Leah was kept captive because she refused to renounce her faith in Christ.

Since then, her parents and Christian groups across Nigeria and the world have pleaded for Leah’s return. A week before the deadline, her mother, Rebecca Sharibu, held a press conference expressing her anguish and begging the government to “bring Leah back.”

“As we are approaching October 15, on Monday, I am pleading with the federal government, and the president, to hear my plea and the plea of Leah’s dad to secure the release of our daughter,” Rebecca said.

Watch footage from Rebecca Sharibu’s recent press conference:

On Sunday, 24 hours before ISWAP’s deadline, the International Committee of the Red Cross urged the group to free the women:

“We urge you: spare and release these women. They are a midwife, a nurse, and a student. Like all those abducted, they are not part of any fight,” said Patricia Danzi, director of ICRC Operations in Africa. “They are daughters and sisters, one is a mother — women with their futures ahead of them, children to raise, and families to return to.”

Nigerian Minister of Information and Culture, Alhaji Lai Mohammed, described the killing as “dastardly, inhuman and ungodly,” saying “nothing can justify the shedding of the blood of innocent people …

“We are deeply pained by this killing, just like we were by the recent killing of Saifura Ahmed, the first aid worker. However, we will keep the negotiations open and continue to work to free the innocent women who remain in the custody of their abductors.”

In recent months, ISWAP has issued a number of messages aimed at putting pressure on Nigerian authorities to pay ransoms for the release of Leah and the kidnapped aid workers, without success.

CONTINUE TO PRAY FERVENTLY WITH LEAH SHARIBU AND HER FAMILY

Pray for God’s protection over Leah physically, mentally and spiritually. We pray that not a hair on this young girl’s head would be touched or harmed. Ask God to reveal to her a vision of His army of warrior angels as they surround her.

Pray for the other hostages with Leah, especially Alice Loksha Ngaddah. God, we ask for her protection and that these two believers would find comfort and courage in each other, praying together.

Pray for strength–that Leah and Alice would be reminded of Your promise to never leave or forsake them. We pray for Your words to flow through their minds.

Pray for peace. We pray for calmness of spirit that only God can provide. Ask God to give Leah, Alice and their families enduring patience, to place peace that passes all our understanding in their hearts and as others see that peace, many will come to know Christ.

Pray for a bold witness. Ask God to be Leah’s and Alice’s light in this darkness and make their lives living testimonies. May their witness be so profound to their captors’ eyes, ears and hearts that they would be opened to the truth.

Pray for comfort. Ask God to be tangibly close to Leah, Alice and their families–that His presence would give them peace, comfort, strength, faith, and even joy as they set their eyes on Him.

Pray for rescue. Pray that God would open closed doors to bring Leah, Alice and the rest of the captives home. Ask God to work a miracle so divine that it would astound her captors and lead many of them to Him. We ask that their captors’ eyes might be open to the heavenly realm and the myriad of angels surrounding them.

Pray for the families of the executed midwives. Ask God to comfort them and provide for them in ways they could never imagine.

Pray for the Nigerian government and President Buhari–that they will be convicted to work diligently and do all they can to release all hostages. Pray that the international community will not remain silent on this, but will assist the government to fulfill their responsibilities towards these citizens.

In Your Son’s name, we pray and ask for these things… #RememberLeah

Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever! (Ephesians 3: 20-21)

Leave your prayers for Leah and her family at our Leah Sharibu Prayer Wall where hundreds of believers have shared their hearts and words, interceding and groaning for her return. 

GOVERNMENT SHUTS DOWN OVER 8,000 CHURCHES

Govt shuts down over 8,000 churches
The government’s new regulations are seriously threatening the Christian community.

Rwanda shuts down over 8,000 churches after new laws (churchleaders)
Rwanda’s government shuts down over 8,000 churches, following new laws.
Earlier this year, the Rwanda Governance Board issued new regulations for the religious community. These included basic requirements in terms of “safety, hygiene, infrastructure, and legality.”

So far, not less than 8, 000 churches have been closed. According to a report by Rwanda’s KT Press, the number of closed churches is going to get higher.

“On checking which churches were included, we learned that all churches are suffering the same fate and that even churches considered luxurious for local standards have had to close,” an anonymous local analyst told World Watch Monitor.

Concerning the enforcement of these laws, the anonymous source said, “in one village the church was closed while a wedding was ongoing. The couple and all the guests were simply told to leave the church during the service, and the church was closed.”

The analyst continued, “Another church was stopped from having services and other meetings (such as home groups) in a school hall as an alternative after all the churches in that parish had been closed. The church had timber instead of a metal door and window frames, and was told the roof also needed to be elevated ‘just a little.'”

Reportedly, these laws have not been approved officially but this has not stopped authorities from imposing the regulations on churches, who are expected to make the required changes within the given time frame of 15 days.

“It seems that the local authorities in the different districts initially had some freedom about the degree to which they could enforce the new requirements,” the local analyst also said. “However, it now seems that those who were more lenient have been rebuked and have become stricter. In one district authorities banned all meetings of a closed church, and congregants are not even allowed to meet in home groups.”

Sainte-Famille Church in Kigali (Flickr/Adam Jones/CC)
Everything you need to know about the new laws
Here are some of the new requirements:

Toilets being a certain distance from the church entrance. In one instance local authorities entered the church halfway through the service and ordered the people to leave because the church would be closed. This church has fulfilled 80% of the requirements and was not aware of this new requirement.
Congregations have been told they also need to install a certain kind of canvas ceiling, even though that material carries a considerable fire hazard.
One church was told it needed to change its roof and rebuild one of the brick walls. This will be hard for them to do as they have already been forced to make loans and depend on the goodwill of businessmen to meet the initial requirements.
Church access roads, as well as church compounds, need to be paved.
The inside walls and ceilings in the church must be plastered and painted. Exposed brick is not allowed anymore.
All churches must have lightning-conductors.
All pastors now need to have a theological degree. This was already communicated as a requirement, but now the degree needs to be from an accredited institute.
Another new law states that only institutions that also teach science and technology can teach theology, meaning that few of the many (often highly regarded) theological institutions or Bible schools are regarded as valid.

Explaining the need for these regulations, Prof. Anastase Shyaka - Chief Executive Officer of Rwanda Governance Board said, “In fact, we discovered that the number of churches were bigger than the number of villages in the country.”

President Kagame has said that he is surprised by the large number of churches in the country, adding that Rwandans do not have the means to sustain these churches (Andrew Gombert-Pool/Getty Image)
According to him, “The number itself is not a problem but in some buildings, three or four different denominations would hold prayer services at the same time, resulting in unbearable levels of noise and unsafe environment for occupants.”

He also responded to critics who say the government is either pushing secularism or targetting certain religious denomination.

“All prayer houses including Catholic, Adventists, Muslims and born-again Churches had issues. They were all assessed and those found not meeting standards were closed down,” Prof. Shyaka told KT Radio.

PALESTINIAN PASTOR RECALLS PERSONAL ENCOUNTER WITH JESUS THAT LED HIM TO REPENT OF HATRED FOR JEWS

Steve Warren

Bassam Adranly was born a Palestinian and grew up in the Greek Orthodox Christian tradition.  

In a recent interview with Revive Live, he says he often criticized Jews. While in his 20s and attending a university in Tel Aviv, he turned to atheism.

In 1995, he says he had a personal encounter with Jesus Christ that turned his life around. 

“Every night I was dreaming of Him, all night through,” Adranly says. “Going with Him and His disciples everywhere. … and all day through, I couldn’t get His words out of my mind.”

Adranly said at the time he had a hatred of Jews like many other Palestinians. 

“I was wrestling with this and I knew it was wrong. So I gave myself to the Lord to change it,” he told the television program. 

Adranly said God touched his heart and his prejudice was gone. 

Today, he is an Arab-Christian living in Israel and pastors a congregation in the city center of Jerusalem.

“The Lord showed me very clearly that nationality is not something I receive. It’s not something that I just take from my old life,” Adranly explained.  “The Word of God in 2 Corinthians 5:17 says ‘Who is in Christ is a new creation. Old things have passed away,” and it includes our nationality. So we have to come to the Lord and ask to receive from him what he wants to teach (me) about my nationality, about my people.”

Also read 👉🏼ARCHAEOLOGISTS CLAIM TO DISCOVER EVIDENCE FOR BIBLICAL ACCOUNT OF EXODUS NEAR JORDAN RIVER

Watch Pastor Bassam Adranly’s interview with Revive Live on Youtube. 

ARCHAEOLOGISTS CLAIM TO DISCOVER EVIDENCE FOR BIBLICAL ACCOUNT OF EXODUS NEAR JORDAN RIVER

Archaeologists Claim to Discover Evidence for Biblical Account of Exodus Near Jordan River

Will Maule, Faithwire

A team of archaeologists has discovered evidence which they believe backs up the biblical account of Moses leading the Israelites out of Egyptian slavery and into the promised land of Canaan.

End Times Prophesies, Mormons, Muslims and Secret Handshakes: The Wild Conspiracy Keeping Pastor Brunson From Returning Home

Despite a long-running debate over the historical accuracy of the story, found in the book of Exodus, archaeologists Ralph K. Hawkins and David Ben-Shlomo have said that there is clear evidence of ruins belonging to a nomadic people group who were traveling from Egypt.

“We have not proved that these camps are from the period of the early Israelites, but it is possible,” Ben-Shlomo told The Express. “If they are, this might fit the biblical story of the Israelites coming from east of the Jordan River, then crossing the Jordan and entering into the hill country of Israel later.”

The archaeologists further noted that they were planning to excavate nearby Uja el-Foqa to figure out whether it may have also be linked to an Israelite settlement in the region.

The story of Moses and the exodus of the Israelites is one of the most well-known in the Bible, particularly as it features the parting of the Red Sea.

Exodus 14: 21-22 reads:

“Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the Lord drove the sea back by a strong east wind all night and made the sea dry land, and the waters were divided. 22 And the people of Israel went into the midst of the sea on dry ground, the waters being a wall to them on their right hand and on their left.”

Several other stunning discoveries have been made in the region over recent years. In 2013, at Khirbet el-Mastarah in the Jordan Valley, Hawkins and Ben-Shlomo unearthed stone ruins and pottery fragments thought to be from the Late Bronze Age (1400–1200 B.C.) or the Iron Age (1200–1000).

By the end of our 2017 season, we were struck by the fascinating picture that had begun to emerge in the Jordan Valley, a region that up until recently has been virtually unknown archaeologically,” the pair told the Biblical Archaeology Society. “Within a range of just a couple of miles, we may be able to see the evolution of early Israel from a domestic-scale culture [at Khirbet el-Mastarah] to a political-scale culture [at Khirbet ‘Auja el-Foqa].”

(H/T: The Express)

CHINA TAKES EXTREME MEASURES TO WIPE OUT ALL TRACES OF JESUS, CHRISTIANITY


Goins-Phillips, Faithwire- CBN

A massive crackdown on religious freedom has for years been underway in China, where churches are being demolished, Bibles confiscated and posters of Jesus replaced with imagery of President Xi Jinping.

In China, the communist government sees the spread of the Christian faith as a Western threat to their culture and way of life. In 2016, Xi said, “We must resolutely guard against overseas infiltrations via religious means.”

The Chinese government wrote religious freedom provisions into its constitution in 1982, but that hasn’t slowed the oppression of Christians living in the restrictive country.

According to a recent report from The Sun, Xi’s regime has gone so far as even barring children from visiting churches.

The most recent crackdown has reportedly been in the Xinjiang province, along the borders of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Government officials have called the region “not Chinese enough.”

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As a result, Xi’s administration is requiring “Chinese characteristics” to be incorporated into all activities, religious beliefs and cultural traditions, a large part of which is adherence to the communist ideology.

Xi began his push for the “sinicization” of the Catholic Church in particular in 2015, when he said the Church must be free of any “foreign influence.” Earlier this year, bishops in China jumpstarted an effort to bring the Catholic Church in the Asian country more in-line with the native culture.

And despite its claims of religious tolerance, in June, officials with the Chinese government tore down Christian imagery of Jesus from Our Lady of Mount Carmel in China’s Henan province, which has served as a popular pilgrimage for Chinese Catholics since the very early 1900s.

One religious source on the ground told the Catholic News Agency at the time that the Communist government would “allow Catholicism to exist but not develop.”

The Chinese government also destroyed the Liangwang Catholic Church in July, according to Asia News, even though the building was owned by the community and had been registered since 2006

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 As for unregistered Protestant house churches, according to The Associated Press, Xi’s government once seemingly tolerated them. But that’s no longer the case. Now the Communist regime is taking a tougher approach that leans heavily on “thought reform,” a kind of political indoctrination.

In November 2017, Christian residents of a rural township in the southeast Jiangxi province were convinced by the government to replace posters of the cross and Jesus with images of the Chinese president.

“Xi is a closet Maoist — he is very anxious about thought control,” Willy Lam, a Chinese politics expert at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, told the AP. “He definitely does not want people to be faithful members of the church, because then people would profess their allegiance to the church rather than to the party, or more exactly, to Xi himself.”

There are also several instances in which the government confiscated Christian literature and Bibles. One such raid occurred in May, when government authorities stole more than 1,000 Chinese Bibles from five house churches in the Shandong province, claiming it was part of an effort to quell the spread of pornography in the sprawling country.

All of this is part of the government plan to “Sinicize” churches, both Protestant and Catholic.

“Only Sinicized churches can obtain God’s love,” the government stated.

According to a recent report from The Sun, Xi’s regime has gone so far as even barring children from visiting churches.

The most recent crackdown has reportedly been in the Xinjiang province, along the borders of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Government officials have called the region “not Chinese enough.”

SUBSCRIBE to Faithwire for stories of FAITH and INSPIRATION, Faithwire …it’s free!

As a result, Xi’s administration is requiring “Chinese characteristics” to be incorporated into all activities, religious beliefs and cultural traditions, a large part of which is adherence to the communist ideology.

Xi began his push for the “sinicization” of the Catholic Church in particular in 2015, when he said the Church must be free of any “foreign influence.” Earlier this year, bishops in China jumpstarted an effort to bring the Catholic Church in the Asian country more in-line with the native culture.

And despite its claims of religious tolerance, in June, officials with the Chinese government tore down Christian imagery of Jesus from Our Lady of Mount Carmel in China’s Henan province, which has served as a popular pilgrimage for Chinese Catholics since the very early 1900s.

One religious source on the ground told the Catholic News Agency at the time that the Communist government would “allow Catholicism to exist but not develop.”

The Chinese government also destroyed the Liangwang Catholic Church in July, according to Asia News, even though the building was owned by the community and had been registered since 2006.

As for unregistered Protestant house churches, according to The Associated Press, Xi’s government once seemingly tolerated them. But that’s no longer the case. Now the Communist regime is taking a tougher approach that leans heavily on “thought reform,” a kind of political indoctrination.

In November 2017, Christian residents of a rural township in the southeast Jiangxi province were convinced by the government to replace posters of the cross and Jesus with images of the Chinese president.

“Xi is a closet Maoist — he is very anxious about thought control,” Willy Lam, a Chinese politics expert at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, told the AP. “He definitely does not want people to be faithful members of the church, because then people would profess their allegiance to the church rather than to the party, or more exactly, to Xi himself.”

Also read Persecution of Christians

There are also several instances in which the government confiscated Christian literature and Bibles. One such raid occurred in May, when government authorities stole more than 1,000 Chinese Bibles from five house churches in the Shandong province, claiming it was part of an effort to quell the spread of pornography in the sprawling country.

All of this is part of the government plan to “Sinicize” churches, both Protestant and Catholic.

“Only Sinicized churches can obtain God’s love,” the government stated.

#Pray for persecuted churches churches

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VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN BEGINS IN THE WOMB

Elaine Storkey

Sabu George, a Delhi-based researcher, has spent the past quarter-century exposing what he calls “the worst kind of violence” in Indian history—the elimination of millions of unborn girls. He regards it as nothing less than genocide and describes the first few months in the womb as “the riskiest part of a woman’s life cycle in India.”

For the last two decades, reports have consistently illustrated the extent of the problem. After investigators uncovered 400 pieces of bone believed to be of female fetuses, reporters gave graphic details: “Last September,” wrote Raekha Prasad and Randeep Ramesh in The Guardian, “remains of dozens of babies were exhumed from a pit outside an abortion clinic in Punjab. To dispose of the evidence, acid was used to melt the flesh and then the bones were hammered to smithereens.”

Although it’s easy to relegate this story to the remote regions of the developing world, India is representative of a global problem of epic proportion. In the year of the #MeToo movement, the practice of female feticide offers us a powerful depiction of the institutionalization of violence against women. Sex-selective abortions perpetrate violence against the most vulnerable, unseen victims. What emerges is an alarming picture of mass termination: prenatal offspring, aborted for no other reason than they happen to be female.

According to a study by The Lancet, the toll in India averages half a million fetuses each year, with some regions of India faring particularly badly. Although accurate figures are very difficult to compile, estimates suggest that “among the stock of women that could potentially be alive in India today, over 25 million are ‘missing.’” Not all of this loss is the result of abortion. Female babies who do not fall victim to prenatal selection and elimination are not guaranteed survival after birth. The evidence shows overwhelmingly that infanticide, the age-old method of eradicating girls, is still very common.

Female gendercide is perhaps the clearest statement of the low value and disposability of girls and women. According to J. Godwin Prem Singh, author of Milennium Development Goals, “the elimination of girl children, either through sex-selective abortion or infanticide, goes largely uncensored, undetected, unpunished and unmourned.” These procedures are now woven into the fabric of much of Indian culture, sitting menacingly alongside sexual violence, domestic abuse, and rape and anticipating the brutalities experienced by women in other contexts.

Selective abortion used to be seen as a problem of poverty—where parents of large families could not afford more children and aborted the less economically productive offspring—but evidence now indicates that it’s as much a problem of affluence. Educated parents plan their families and pay fees to clinics, radiologists, and doctors to identify the sex of their child. Cheap, portable ultrasound technology is widely available, and affluent in-laws pressure their daughters-in-law to give birth to sons. One survey, in fact, revealed that female feticide was highest among women with university degrees. Although some international development experts maintain that wealth and education will alleviate the social ills against women, in India, affluence has not challenged feticide. It has simply made it easier.

Development and globalization have increased personal wealth and decreased the average family size, but they have not erased traditional patriarchal values. Wealthier and better-educated Indians still want sons. This entrenched cultural preference is what drives sex-selective abortion in India: Boys are seen as of greater social and economic value to their birth families, while daughters, by contrast, become subject to their husbands’ families. Girls’ parents also supply the dowry. In India today, an educated, successful bridegroom comes at a high price, and that dowry cost might leave the girl’s family in debt for the rest of their lives.

Violence against women in the womb begets another kind of violence. As a result of India’s missing girls, a large cohort of men cannot marry, and as brides become scarce, the trafficking of women and girls increases. A Reuters report in 2017 identified an annual 25 percent rise in trafficked women and children in India. Most trafficked victims end up in domestic servitude, sex slavery, and enforced marriage. Sexual harassment is also common. National data published this year in India announced a spike in incidents of murder, abduction, rape, and dowry deaths. (India’s National Crime Records Bureau reported in 2017 that a young woman is killed every hour in India after family failure to meet ongoing dowry demands from her in-laws and husband.)

For K. S. Jacob, professor of psychiatry at the Christian Medical College of Vellore, India, “female foeticide and infanticide are just the tip of the iceberg; there is a whole set of subtle and blatant discriminatory practices against girls and women that are done under various pretexts.” In other words, violence begins in the womb but continues into female adulthood in ways that profoundly shape the larger culture.

India, of course, is not the only country that practices selective abortion. In China, when family size was limited by one-child policies between 1979 and 2015, most parents wanted a son. The resulting gender imbalance is profound: Men now outnumber women by 34 million in a population of 1.4 billion. Here, too, gendercide becomes fuel for human trafficking and prostitution, with girls brought in from Cambodia, Vietnam, and North Korea.

It’s easy to dismiss foreign cultures that exhibit “archaic” gender attitudes and lack an egalitarian legal base, but in fact, the problem is far more widespread. Violence against women happens on every continent and every culture. Even in the US, it often begins before birth. Sex-selection may not be prevalent in America, but as in India, it has increased with technological development, includes the wealthy, and brings a lucrative living for those who provide the services.

The US has been heralded as the world capital for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), the medical procedure that fertilizes eggs outside the womb and transfers the developed embryos into the uterus once the desired characteristics are identified. Originally, the purpose was to screen out embryos with a genetic disease, but it’s now used widely for sex selection. Americans from Indian and Chinese backgrounds use PGD in an attempt to ensure their offspring are male (98% choose boys) and other American parents use it to procure the sex of their choice. In either case, live embryos of the “wrong” sex are simply discarded.

Although overseas American clinics treat women from 150 other countries where sex-selection is banned, on US soil, neither federal nor state authorities regulate PGD for sex selection. By contrast, sex-selection is illegal in India, and although the law is poorly enforced, those involved in the abortion of girls have been prosecuted. In most European nations, including the UK, France, and Switzerland, strict human embryology laws prohibit the practice. Not so in the US. While some countries practice selective abortion due to ingrained cultural practices, others do it for “designer babies,” which is arguably just as reprehensible. The abortion of millions of healthy embryos might look less primitive and violent in the US than sex-selective abortion and infanticide in India, but the similarities remain. Moral boundaries cannot be eliminated by technology, however sanitized the process.

As Christians, we know that our human identity is made in the image of God, which means we must challenge the violation of other persons. Scripture admonishes us to respect the most vulnerable among us, so the fetus in the womb and the pregnant mother are therefore entitled to special care and concern. At the same time, our theology of sin alerts us to the problems of indifference, brutality, and greed. Across the globe, deep-seated cultural attitudes have merged with contemporary materialism to produce a system that can devalue, degrade, and control women in every stage of their development.

The gospels were written against a patriarchal background, yet in his many gentle encounters with women, Jesus rebuffs the attitudes prevalent in his culture. Accordingly, we need to be critical of what has often been normalized in our own culture, especially when it runs counter to a biblical pattern of equal human significance. Our Christian calling is to be both prophets and healers in a broken world, to hold cultures to account and bring redemptive change, along with hope and restoration to those who have been damaged.

We can partner with others in this effort. Activists all over the globe have founded organizations dedicated to eradicating violence against women and fighting sex-selective abortions. In India, for example, the activist Varsha Deshpande started an organization called Lek Ladki Abhiyan, which receives information through its hotline and enlists pregnant volunteers as decoys to collect evidence on doctors breaking the law. Their painstaking commitment has brought people to justice. Wonderful work is also being done in hundreds of homes throughout India, many of them Christian, where families care for abandoned newborn girls and those who survive late abortion attempts.

As we look to the future, civil society, educators, faith leaders, media, churches, and legislators need to join together in developing and implementing a greater vision of equality. Only when we value and cherish girls—especially at the beginnings of life—do we stand a chance of eradicating violence against women. Much more remains to be done in India, China, the US, and elsewhere. For now, it starts with recognizing the failure of two fundamental human rights: women being denied safety and girls being denied the basic right to be born.

Elaine Storkey is an academic, author, broadcaster, and former president of Tearfund, an international Christian aid organization. For ten years she worked with John Stott, directing the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity. She has taught in universities in the UK and overseas—including India, Haiti, Ethiopia, and the US—and is currently a senior member of Newnham College, Cambridge University.

Parts of this piece were adapted from Scars Across Humanity: Understanding and Overcoming Violence Against Women by Elaine Storkey. Copyright (c) 2018 by Elaine Storkey. Published by InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, IL. http://www.ivpress.com.

For more stories, visit: http://www.christianitytoday.com

BEN CARSON SPEAKS: PART ONE

Source: BEN CARSON SPEAKS: PART ONE